Colorado Creationism Bill Dies In Comittee

creationism

Another attempt to treat superstition as the equivalent of science has failed to pass a state legislature. This time, Colorado state Republicans tried, and failed, to pass a law that would teach creationism and deny global warming in public schools. Huffington Post reports:

Democrats on the House Committee on Education voted 7-6 rejecting House Bill 13-1089 and also voted 7-6 to indefinitely shelve future considerations of the bill.

“This victory in Colorado was too close,” Eugenie Scott, executive director of the National Center for Science Education said. “People in Colorado and elsewhere need to understand that these bills would be nothing but trouble: scientifically misleading, pedagogically unnecessary, and likely to produce administrative, legal, and economic headaches.”

Last week, Claire Levy (D-Boulder), chair of the House Appropriations committee,called the bill “D.O.A.” on Denver’s AM 760 with host Geoff Berg. Levy told Berg that House Bill 13-1089 used the term “academic freedom” loosely allowing for creationism to be taught in classrooms:

I think it’s safe to say it’s not going to make it to the Governor’s desk. The bill looks innocuous enough when you read it, it purports to advocate objective scientific analysis and teaching all sides of issues and encouraging students to inquire but when you look beneath the surface it’s pretty obvious that it’s asking science teachers or allowing science teachers to teach creationism and deny global warming.

Bill Nye said it better than I can:

“The Earth is not 6,000 or 10,000 years old,” Nye said to the AP, citing scientific estimates that the Earth is about 4.5 billion years old. “It’s not. And if that conflicts with your beliefs, I strongly feel you should question your beliefs.”

Nye added: “If we raise a generation of students who don’t believe in the process of science, who think everything that we’ve come to know about nature and the universe can be dismissed by a few sentences translated into English from some ancient text, you’re not going to continue to innovate.”

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11 Responses to Colorado Creationism Bill Dies In Comittee

  1. Pingback: Colorado Creationism Bill Dies In Comittee | digger666

  2. amyclae says:

    I love it when Nye says, “If we raise a generation of students who don’t believe in the process of science, who think everything that we’ve come to know about nature and the universe can be dismissed by a few sentences translated into English from some ancient text, you’re not going to continue to innovate.”

    Admittedly true, but he seems oblivious to the reality that kids are dismissing what ‘we have come to know’ by a few sentences (sometimes they need to be translated into English!) from their phones.

    In other words, if these schools were about to teach Creationism with the same gusto and competency as they’ve taught math and reading then there’s nothing Nye to worry about.

  3. uberspeck says:

    This country was founded on the principle that anyone can practice the belief of their choice. Something I *fully* support. However, the religious right doesn’t seem to grasp that Freedom of Religion is not the freedom to cram their personal beliefs down our throats via legislation. That’s exactly what the constitution is trying to protect us from. Just another example of your basic Teavangelical hypocrisy. They’re all about individual freedoms…as long as they coincide with their personal beliefs.

    For an atheist, like myself, the idea of teaching creationism in publicly funded schools is maddening. Creationism, Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy and Puff the Magic Dragon are all on equal footing. It’s fiction, possibly allegorical/metaphorical, with no basis in reality and no evidence to the contrary. If you want to force feed your child such stories as reality you have temples, churches and synagogues on every other corner that are more than happy to help. Don’t drag that stuff into my child’s world and attempt to take that choice away from them.

    *Disclaimer – I’m not a parent, but If I were, everything above applies 😉

    • Plus they only want their creation myth taught in class. Should we also include the creation story of every religion, past and present? Just because an ancient religion is no longer practiced does not mean it wasn’t the right one. We should “teach the controversy.”

  4. Barneysday says:

    Creationism has no basis in science, no basis in reality. Teaching voodooism in school, as though it were a science, is ludicrous, and would bring us back to the standards of the 17th century.

    If the writers of the gospels got their time periods wrong, then what else did they get wrong?

    The “bible” is an interesting read, a book of dialogue created by men, men who lived in some cases 300 years after the death of Jesus. Whats in the bible, and more importantly, what was kept out of the bible, was decided by a committee of men. As I said, its an interesting read, not so much as a cornerstone of science.

  5. It’s really not that unreasonable to think that the writers of the gospels got their time periods wrong. Mind you words from a dying or ancient language can easily be mistranslated. How can anyone really understand what a billion years really is to them. Especially in that time.

    As for teaching creationism, I don’t understand why it can’t be done in tandem with evolution. I forget the term, but I believe God created the world and evolution thus continued to evolve the planet. I can understand the concern of teaching religious principles at public schools though.

    • Its not unreasonable at all to expect errors in the bible. I don’t blame the writers because they were just fallible humans like the rest of us.

      Creationism is dangerous because it directly defies what science says about our origins. It says that the earth was created 6,000 years ago exactly as describes in 1 Genesis.

      Even the pope accepts evolution and the scientific age of the earth.

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